When To Use A The AN?

What are the rules for using a or an?

Here’s the secret to making the rule work: The rule applies to the sound of the letter beginning the word, not just the letter itself.

The way we say the word will determine whether or not we use a or an.

If the word begins with a vowel sound, you must use an.

If it begins with a consonant sound, you must use a..

What is A and an called?

The Articles. The three articles — a, an, the — are a kind of adjective. The is called the definite article because it usually precedes a specific or previously mentioned noun; a and an are called indefinite articles because they are used to refer to something in a less specific manner (an unspecified count noun).

How do you teach a and an?

Use an before words that begin with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) and a before words that begin with a consonant. Note: Words that begin with a “u” or “h” take an if the noun begins with a vowel sound (e.g., an umbrella, an heir) and a if the noun begins with a consonant sound (e.g., a university, a house). 4.

When to use a and an examples?

“A” is used before words starting in consonant sounds and “an” is used before words starting with vowel sounds. It doesn’t matter if the word is an adjective, a noun, an adverb, or anything else; the rule is exactly the same.

Where do we use a an?

The is used to refer to specific or particular nouns; a/an is used to modify non-specific or non-particular nouns. We call the the definite article and a/an the indefinite article. … “A/an” is used to refer to a non-specific or non-particular member of the group.